Friday in Tokyo

Friday in Tokyo

Tokyo seems fairly normal today.   The trains still aren't as crowded as before but there are mad races home for fear of blackouts.   There are still a lot of people working from home as the offices are light in terms of staff.  Fuel continues to be sold out.   Power is being conserved to avoid sudden blackouts.   Some families are choosing to leave Japan but many are also staying.    The media is sensationalizing the situation in Tokyo.  Many stores are sold out of dairy products and have limited bread products.  Tokyo is far from the 'starving ghost town' that some ridiculous new reports have referred to it as.  Concern remains for the situation in Fukushima and thought and prayers go out to the people there.   Start Friday… All of the pictures were shot with a Leica M9 and a Noctilux 50mm f/0.95 lens for the most part they are shot at .95, iso 160 and various shutter speeds.

Early morning out the door and to the office...

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My local gas station remains sold out.

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As Japan heads into a 3 day weekend Mizuho Bank announced that they had suspended ATM machine service and were not able to deposit 620,000 salaries into customers accounts due to computer glitches.

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A Mizuho employee explains that the ATMs are closed as his manager looks on.

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Peko-chan stands guard outside a Fujiya Cakeshop.

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The rolling blackout schedule continues to be posted at the station entrance.

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Vending machines are being restocked.

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Vending machines are being restocked across Japan.

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As I haven't ridden the train as much as I have the past week, I stopped off to make sure my 'train manners' were up to speed.

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...respect the women only cars.

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A sign hangs saying the trains are not running on schedule...

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A women reads travel brochures at Shibuya Station.  Perhaps a quick escape to 'ha-wai-ii'

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Police watch traffic carefully looking for a driver to cross a yellow line when he realizes he doesn't want to turn so they can give him a ticket and make their quota ensuring it flows smoothly and safely.

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A Tokyo Electric Power (TEPCO) employee stands watch outside a restaurant that is being inspected.

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An office security guard writes down the serial number of bikes parked illegally.

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Sunkus convenience store announces, via this cute penguin, that they once again have rice balls available for sale after not having for the past week.   Tokyo is beginning to feel much more like Tokyo.

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After several hours of working today I realized my time and skills would be more useful elsewhere for the day and heading out to Akihabara.

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Meet Akiko... She is one of the many great souls working hard at Second Harvest Japan in Asakusabashi.      Second Harvest is working to distribute food and daily goods to people in the areas affected by the Earthquake.    They need your help and what they really need are donations to help with financial support for logistical costs such as truck fuels, highway tolls, maintenance fees, drivers and so on.  You can donate HERE.

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Letters of thanks hang on the wall from the many people they have helped.  Our society needs more people like this.

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The schedule for this week's trips north to Sendai to deliver supplies.   This was a much better way for me to spend my afternoon and I am glad I did.   I also left Second Harvest with 60 or so of the photos I took there.   Hopefully it will help them promote their efforts.   I look forward to the opportunity to shoot for them again.

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I have travelled to many countries where I don't speak the language and have gotten pretty good at understanding the meaning of signs... #2 and #3 I get but what is the first?

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Time to head home...

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Trains have people.   It isn't Thursday in Tokyo crowded but it is pretty normal.

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Signs continue to highlight trains effected by earthquakes or blackouts.

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As I exited the underground I stopped at Preece to have a look around.   Bread was completely sold out but fruits and vegetables are stacked high.  Look at these big juicy tomatoes.

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...and $7 dollar packs of strawberries.

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If junk food is more your thing, there is a new vending machines that has Ice Cream for 120 yen!

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Meet Mariko...she has bread, well bagels anyways.    Check out Bagel & Bagel in Meguro Atre if you still can't find bread products.    If you are really stuck, call me, I bought 10 and you can have one of mine.

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Hopefully the sensationalism will die down in the news so this nation can get focused on recovery and rebuilding.  Let's see what Saturday brings...

Tonight's 'Supermoon' over Tokyo

Tonight's 'Supermoon' over Tokyo

Thursday in Tokyo

Thursday in Tokyo

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